Rec-Mounts Stem Spacer Computer Mount

I got my hands on a GPS accessory recently that I’m quite impressed with. Rec-Mounts is a Japanese company that makes TONS of mounting accessories for lots of applications. They sell some of their products on Amazon, thankfully, because it looks like ordering through their website directly could be difficult.

Their products are top notch.

I started out with their Type 10 stem spacer mount. Couple things I like about the products this company makes. Namely, their modularity. They use a number of fairly standard mounting systems so a lot of their stuff is interchangeable. The Type 10 mount has a GoPro adapter as the adjustable pivot. So I can pull the 1/4 turn adapter off and put something else there to mount a different computer.

Running and Town Run Trail + Ft Ben + Garmin Forerunner 310XT

I wrote a few weeks back that I had lost my Garmin Forerunner 205 after a trip to Texas. I thought it had to be at my house in Texas. I have made do for the past few weeks, borrowing my wife’s Forerunner and even using my Oregon 450 on an 8mi run in Houston. That became a real pain because I have been unable to sustain a long run in the past couple weeks because of some knee pain setting in around mile 5 or 6. I haven’t been able to track myself otherwise. I broke down and ordered a Garmin Forerunner 310XT refurb. It retained the training features of the 205 that I like, added the HRM sensor compatibility and foot pod compatibility I want to upgrade to (maybe next season) and had the bonus of also being compatible with my Tanita bc-1000 scale so I can finally start transferring metrics to Garmin Connect. I’m not sure how I’ll like tracking my metrics there or not. I’m going to give it a try. Tanita’s software is only okay.

Making Transparent Maps for your Garmin GPS with GPX2IMG

I have had a number of questions from readers about how to get some certain trail data onto their GPS. That answer is complicated, because it depends on the trail data and it depends on the GPS you have. If the trail data you want to use is a simple track from someone’s previous ride, you can load it directly onto your GPS. Fitness GPS receivers (like the Edge models with mapping) can do a Virtual Partner based on that file and do performance comparisons and whatnot. With a mapping handheld, you get a basic navigation (it warns you if you deviate from the trail, but not much more). If that .gpx track has more track points than your GPS receiver’s track point limit, you have to reduce the number of points in the track by simplifying it (some programs allow you to do this) or by converting it to a route, which will prompt you to turn (best used on roads where turns occur at intersections, than on trails where turns often occur dependent on terrain).

New Garmin Handheld GPS Receivers

There’s been some buzz lately about some new GPS receivers that look like they’re going to replace the venerable GPSMap 60 and 76 series models. Garmin has so far confirmed a 78, the replacement for the 76. As of now, there are only just rumors about a replacement to the 60, a supposed 62. GPSFix has some informative posts worth reading if you’re interested in this sort of thing. There’s a post for the 78, and one for the expected 62.

I’m pretty interested in these, since I’m a longtime GPSMap 76 CSx user. I had mine rigged to my handlebars some years ago before I bought an Edge 705.

Putting Maps on your Garmin GPS

I’ve run into this a lot lately on various forums. It seems a lot of folks still don’t know that you don’t have to buy Garmin’s maps to load on your GPS.

I’ll start with some programs you’ll need. There’s a free route that’s slightly more involved (especially for those with the newer touch-screen GPS receivers, but we’ll get there later. I’ll start with the COMPLETELY free option), and then there’s the option that costs some, but streamlines the process for users with touchscreen receivers.

FREE method. This only works for vector-based basemaps. You also need to make sure your GPS has enough storage space.